Wolf Spiders

February 23, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Wolf Spiders

There are about 100 species of wolf spider in the U.S. They can be intimidating because of the large sizes they can reach, up to 35mm. usually black in color; they are also brown and spotted. Wolf spiders hunt large insects and run quite fast on the ground. They have burrows in the ground and usually leave at night to hunt prey.

            Wolf spiders can be found frequently indoors and can bite humans. They also help keep general insect numbers in check. Wood piles, underneath stones and rocks are good breeding grounds for the spiders. The large, hairy appearance is usually the worst thing about these spiders. Wolf spiders are active in day and night

Sac Spiders

February 22, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Sac spiders

Sac spiders are yellow in color and build a sac like structure where they hide in the daytime. There are only two species of sac spiders in the U.S. but it is thought that they are responsible for very high percentage of spider bites inside homes. It is not known if the bites can become serious. They are about 4-10 mm in size.

            Bites are generally when the spider is disturbed in bedding or clothing but it is thought that they will also bite when unprovoked. They will be found in corners of ceilings and walls of basements and all over the house. Sac spiders are a nuisance and should be treated with insecticides when large numbers are present in homes. They will be found outdoors and indoors throughout the season.

Jumping Spiders

February 21, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Jumping Spiders

This spider gets its name from the fact that they can jump to get to their prey. They are small about 4-10 mm. Jumping spiders have large eyes and a “fuzzy” appearance. Some have red on their back which can be mistaken for black widow markings. They are harmless to humans and can be found indoors.

            Jumping spiders do not catch prey in webs but will have small webs for protection and escape. They are unusual from other spiders in that they will be quite active during the day and love warm, sunny days. They can jump up to 20 times their body length. They can be found on cement porches, woodpiles, fences and old wood. Control is obtained through spraying.

. Some have red on their back which can be mistaken for black widow markings. They are harmless to humans and can be found indoors.

            Jumping spiders do not catch prey in webs but will have small webs for protection and escape. They are unusual from other spiders in that they will be quite active during the day and love warm, sunny days. They can jump up to 20 times their body length. They can be found on cement porches, woodpiles, fences and old wood. Control is obtained through spraying.

House Spiders

February 20, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

House Spiders

House spiders are found all over the U.S. and the world. They are the most prevalent spider in homes and structures. The webs can become a nuisance if not removed on a regular basis. They are about 5-8mm in size and are brown or black colored.

            House spiders prefer dark, moist areas with high numbers of other insects. They can be controlled with spraying and removal of webs and eggs. They are harmless to people but rather a housekeeping nuisance

Should I feed the deer?

February 19, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

This winter has been brutal for the wildlife population. Unbelievable amounts of snow made it through global warming. This puts a distinct stress on the deer population here in Iowa. My father lives in a somewhat remote area outside of the Des Moines area and has taken to feeding deer. There is now a herd of about 30 plus deer stationed in his yard on a daily basis. These are not squirrels or birds. Will this protect the precious trees in his yard from being eaten? Will this save the Iowa deer ? The short answer is, no. While my father has a kind heart and has tamed a few Iowa deer they are not any less likely from eating his prescious foliage. In fact, feeding deer increases the likelihood that they will munch on your available greens and twigs. Instead, don’t feed your woodland friends. They will find food elsewhere and will be less likely to snack on your plants and trees.

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Daddy Longlegs, Cellar Spiders

February 18, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Cellar/Daddy Longlegs Spiders

 Daddy longlegs have long legs about 2-8mm in length and are off brown colored. They are usually found along basement ceilings and front porches.

            Daddy longlegs are harmless to people and feed on other insects and spiders. Pest control can be used to keep numbers down but homeowners can also remove webs and eggs to keep numbers down. They are the most common spider of homeowners in Iowa and many other states.

Brown Recluse Spiders

February 17, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Brown Recluse Spiders

Brown Recluse spiders are also called fiddle backs. They get the name from their reclusive behavior and fiddle shaped design on their back. Adults are generally about the size of a quarter. They have long legs and hold themselves up high off the ground. Brown recluses are light brown in color. They do not make webs but prefer dark, moist, undisturbed areas like crawlspaces, attics and closets. If provoked, they will bite and it can be painful.

            There is no cure for infected areas other than removing skin and areas that are dying. If left alone, infected areas spread all over. Medical attention should be sought if bites are suspected. Outdoors they prefer shingles, unused boxes, woodpiles, or clutter in garages for shelter. Pest control is recommended for houses with these spiders.

Spiders

February 15, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Spiders

There are over 35,000 species of spider all over the world. Only about 2-3000 are known in the U.S. Spiders are found wherever there is adequate food, moisture and temperature. Every spider is considered a predator and in the U.S there are only two known types to be dangerous to humans (widows and recluses).

 

Control of spiders is obtained not only through pest control but also by keeping homes clean of clutter and harbor areas. Cleaning up spider webs and food sources will help keep numbers down. Pest control will only help keep numbers down, not eliminate every spider.

Weevils

February 14, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Weevils

Weevils are also located all over the U.S. and are usually about 1/8-11mm long. Generally black in color they mainly feed on plants and can invade structures when food sources are no longer available. Removal of plant debris and decaying vegetation is one of the only ways to control weevils. They are harmless to humans other than being an annoyance.

Thrips

February 13, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Thrips

Thrips are very small about 1/64 of an inch in length and black colored. Thrips are found all over the U.S. and can actually bite people. They generally congregate in gardens and around flowers but can invade homes. Thrips can also transfer diseases in plants and flowers destroying them. Several applications of pesticides can be necessary to control thrips where they are prevalent

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