Stored Product Pests

February 26, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Stored Product Pests

These pests can be responsible for damaging up to %10 of the worlds grain and crops every year. There are numerous types of these pests but most are a type of beetle.

Camel Spiders

February 25, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Not much is know about this creature. It is not a spider but considered an arthropod or solupugid. They can and do bite and can create quite a medical problem. They only live in arid areas and stay in burrows in the sand. Camel spiders prey on insects and other smaller creatures like mice. They are also prey of birds, reptiles and even humans. Camel spiders are considered beneficial but are pests when they invade human homes. People in Iowa don’t need to worry about these creatures.

Wolf Spiders

February 23, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Wolf Spiders

There are about 100 species of wolf spider in the U.S. They can be intimidating because of the large sizes they can reach, up to 35mm. usually black in color; they are also brown and spotted. Wolf spiders hunt large insects and run quite fast on the ground. They have burrows in the ground and usually leave at night to hunt prey.

            Wolf spiders can be found frequently indoors and can bite humans. They also help keep general insect numbers in check. Wood piles, underneath stones and rocks are good breeding grounds for the spiders. The large, hairy appearance is usually the worst thing about these spiders. Wolf spiders are active in day and night

Jumping Spiders

February 21, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Jumping Spiders

This spider gets its name from the fact that they can jump to get to their prey. They are small about 4-10 mm. Jumping spiders have large eyes and a “fuzzy” appearance. Some have red on their back which can be mistaken for black widow markings. They are harmless to humans and can be found indoors.

            Jumping spiders do not catch prey in webs but will have small webs for protection and escape. They are unusual from other spiders in that they will be quite active during the day and love warm, sunny days. They can jump up to 20 times their body length. They can be found on cement porches, woodpiles, fences and old wood. Control is obtained through spraying.

. Some have red on their back which can be mistaken for black widow markings. They are harmless to humans and can be found indoors.

            Jumping spiders do not catch prey in webs but will have small webs for protection and escape. They are unusual from other spiders in that they will be quite active during the day and love warm, sunny days. They can jump up to 20 times their body length. They can be found on cement porches, woodpiles, fences and old wood. Control is obtained through spraying.

House Spiders

February 20, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

House Spiders

House spiders are found all over the U.S. and the world. They are the most prevalent spider in homes and structures. The webs can become a nuisance if not removed on a regular basis. They are about 5-8mm in size and are brown or black colored.

            House spiders prefer dark, moist areas with high numbers of other insects. They can be controlled with spraying and removal of webs and eggs. They are harmless to people but rather a housekeeping nuisance

Confused Flour Beetle

February 18, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Confused Flour Beetle

The confused flour beetle is found all over the world but mostly in northern states in the U.S. Adults is 3-4 mm long and light brown in color. It is the most common infest pest in homes and grocery stores. Confused flour beetles infest products such as: spices, fruits, pepper, drugs and milk chocolate just to name a few.

            If discovered, infested food should be thrown out. Grocery stores should be notified of the infestation. Keep food in sealed containers.

Brown Recluse Spiders

February 17, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Brown Recluse Spiders

Brown Recluse spiders are also called fiddle backs. They get the name from their reclusive behavior and fiddle shaped design on their back. Adults are generally about the size of a quarter. They have long legs and hold themselves up high off the ground. Brown recluses are light brown in color. They do not make webs but prefer dark, moist, undisturbed areas like crawlspaces, attics and closets. If provoked, they will bite and it can be painful.

            There is no cure for infected areas other than removing skin and areas that are dying. If left alone, infected areas spread all over. Medical attention should be sought if bites are suspected. Outdoors they prefer shingles, unused boxes, woodpiles, or clutter in garages for shelter. Pest control is recommended for houses with these spiders.

Spiders

February 15, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Spiders

There are over 35,000 species of spider all over the world. Only about 2-3000 are known in the U.S. Spiders are found wherever there is adequate food, moisture and temperature. Every spider is considered a predator and in the U.S there are only two known types to be dangerous to humans (widows and recluses).

 

Control of spiders is obtained not only through pest control but also by keeping homes clean of clutter and harbor areas. Cleaning up spider webs and food sources will help keep numbers down. Pest control will only help keep numbers down, not eliminate every spider.

Thrips

February 13, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Thrips

Thrips are very small about 1/64 of an inch in length and black colored. Thrips are found all over the U.S. and can actually bite people. They generally congregate in gardens and around flowers but can invade homes. Thrips can also transfer diseases in plants and flowers destroying them. Several applications of pesticides can be necessary to control thrips where they are prevalent

springtails

February 12, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Springtails

Springtails are named such because they have a tail which allows them to spring and jump. They are tiny in size about 1/32 of an inch and black in color. Springtails are found all over the U.S. and the Midwest, they become a nuisance when huge numbers converge around homes. Some basements may be covered with so many springtails that the floor will appear black in color. Springtails eat decaying plant matter and look for high moisture areas especially if the environment becomes dry which is when they can infest houses. Regular spraying and removal of plant matter is necessary to keep numbers in check.

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